Visualization and educational reform

You’ve probably heard of Sir Ken Robinson and his spectacular TED talks. There is a new video on YouTube that has animated his most recent talk.

This video is amazing for a couple of reasons. First, it speaks to the heart of educational reform. I was involved in Inspiring Education (at whose website I first spotted this video), and these ideas of reform are being explored in Alberta in very important ways.

Second, this talk speaks to the heart of being a parent of children who view the world in fundamentally different ways. What might be the best educational approach for our children is something we wrestle with every day.

From a completely different tangent, the third way this video is amazing is the way that it visualizes and strengthens an already powerful talk. As we deal with increasingly larger amounts of data (trivial, essential and everything in-between), visualization will be how we make sense of it.

I hope you enjoy this as much as I do:

Dialogic Research

For quite a while I have been concerned that traditional research tools are insufficient for the types of interesting problems we are being asked to solve. The challenge has been captured by William Isaacs:

Neither the enormous challenges human beings face today, nor the wonderful promise of the future on whose threshold we seem to be poised, can be reached unless human beings learn to think together in a new way.

This has lead to us developing a new form of research that is a synthesis of three disciplines: qualitative research, public consultation and facilitation. It is a process of genuine interaction through which we listen to each other deeply enough to be changed by what we learn.

Traditional research has been a closed system. The research “expert” usually is contracted to gather information and develop insights.  Random participants are carefully selected and lead through a very structured process of discussing rational and emotional thoughts, triggers and stories. And, to be honest, some very excellent research has been conducted this way.

But the world is changing and research needs to become an open system:

  • The ownership of a brand is moving from the marketer to the customer. It’s not what you say about your brand anymore – it’s what consumers are saying about your brand.
  • Peer-to-peer marketing is essential. And much of this is open and user-generated. Structured word-of-mouth strategies where we recruit, motivate and satisfy networks of advocates for organization.
  • Brand engagement is critical to build brand uniqueness. This requires creating communities of customers who are deeply engaged with brand.
  • Brands needs to engage the internal and the external community for longer-term success.
  • As audiences evolve to include more and more Aboriginal and immigrant populations, traditional closed research processes are not the best methods to gather insights. Open, dialogic processes are more effective, and more respectful.

We are calling this type of research Dialogic Research. Our approach has been heavily influenced by some of the leading-edge work in Deliberative Democracy being done by America Speaks and Janette Hartz-Karp.

Not every project is suited to Dialogic Research, but it is ideally suited for projects that

  • Are complex or multi-faceted
  • Have a number of key stakeholders with very distinct points-of-view
  • Are deeply exploring new areas of knowledge
  • Focused on new products or services
  • Are launching a new brand

While Dialogic Research has more logistics to resolve in the early stages, it is proving to be tremendously powerful.

The most important parts of any conversation are those that neither party could have imagined before starting. (Rick Smyre)

Painless Insight Planning – by Susan Abbott

A friend and colleague in Toronto, Susan Abbott, has just published an outstanding free e-book: Painless Insight Planning. This is a workbook to develop a very focused qualitative research brief.

All too often, quite a bit of time is spent trying to figure out what the real research question is – this workbook gets you there quickly and easily. I strongly recommend that you download it, save it and keep it close. Try it out the next time you need to solve a problem – even if you don’t proceed to research, it will give you clarity on what you need to do.

This is another great example of the gift economy at work. Thanks, Susan.